4 STUDENTS CURRENT ISSUE

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Spring 2014
  • Tuition v. salary

    A prospective law school student has many options in Canada.
  • The Evolution of Legal Education

    Students enrolled in Lakehead University’s new law program will be able to practise law after completing just three years of law school. No need to article for a year or complete Ontario’s experimental law practice programs.
  • Licensing version 2.0

    Until now, all Ontario lawyers had to complete the traditional articling process before being called to the bar. But last November, the Law Society of Upper Canada announced it would be running the law practice program, a pilot project intended to give aspiring lawyers an alternative pathway to the Ontario bar.
  • Alternative routes

    Bay Street law firm jobs may be hard to come by, but there might be other places that will let you keep your foot in the legal door once you’re called to the bar or otherwise “between positions.”
  • Mad about ‘mad’ rights

    Madness isn’t just a label or a category. And Lucy Costa wants to change our perception of what “mad” actually is — as a scholar, researcher, and activist.

DEPARTMENTS

  • The pros & cons of practising...

    Practising in class actions, in Windsor, Ont., government, in Edmonton.
  • Q & A with Gail Wong

    Gail Wong, director of McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s student program for the Ontario region, talks to 4Students assistant editor Zachary Pedersen about how the law firm recruits new talent.
  • The pros & cons of practising...

    Practising in the 905, in Saint John, N.B., Aboriginal Law, Family Law.
  • Making music

    Making music

    Steven Hansen is a third-year law student at the University of Alberta. Each year, the school holds a cabaret music production organized and performed by students in the Faculty of Law.

OPINIONS

  • Gail J. Cohen

    A costly misstep?

    You have to be *#$?% kidding me! That’s likely the reaction most law students in Ontario had when in February they got their invoices for the Law Society of Upper Canada’s licensing process.

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