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Padraigin Murphy, a second-year law student at the University of Toronto, has a hero. The hero is a friend of Murphy’s who graduated from law school and is now an articling student at a full-service law firm in a small rural community. Her annual salary? $30,000. Her debt load from law school? More than $100,000.
Alissa Saieva first got a taste of the legal life while a student at Central Tech high school.
Alissa Saieva first got a taste of the legal life while a student at Central Tech high school.
Ten years ago, Ron Daniels, then-dean of the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, realized attending law school was a privilege. For him, bringing more diverse students into law school was an access to justice issue, and to help the community and encourage diversity, something needed to be done to reach out — especially in high schools where students were struggling to graduate.
Monday, 08 September 2014 09:00

Law school clinics welcome legal aid funds

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LAO’s Aneurin Thomas says getting more students exposed to family law early will benefit everyone.
LAO’s Aneurin Thomas says getting more students exposed to family law early will benefit everyone.
Legal Aid Ontario is filling a gap in access to justice and at the same time giving law students experience and exposure to family law in university legal aid clinics.
Six university-operated clinics will get more than $2 million from LAO to fund family law services programs for low-income Ontarians. The money will be provided over three years.
Monday, 08 September 2014 09:00

Why I quit my big firm articling job

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Stephanie_Laskoski.jpgRecently I made an enormous decision: I quit an excellent articling job at a big firm in Edmonton. Leaving the position was very difficult, but the stress and pressure I was feeling after only three weeks of work was so great I was not eating or sleeping.
Craig Forcese says law schools should do a better job of preparing students for the modern practice of law.
Craig Forcese says law schools should do a better job of preparing students for the modern practice of law.
Associate professor Craig Forcese of the common law section at the University of Ottawa is interested in the academic engagement of other law professors, in part the pressure on them to pursue research.
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Ted-Flett.jpgThis week, law schools across Canada are back in. Admittedly, my back-to-school emotions are mixed.
Schulich law school dean Kim Brooks says she’d like to see more academic work following up on what happens to those with a legal education.
Schulich law school dean Kim Brooks says she’d like to see more academic work following up on what happens to those with a legal education.
The Canadian Bar Association’s 2014 Legal Futures report explores some interesting possibilities for law students and their education.
Chris Bentley says Ryerson has paid and unpaid placements ready to go but more are still needed.
Chris Bentley says Ryerson has paid and unpaid placements ready to go but more are still needed.
With the law practice program’s French and English sections ramping up for Sept. 2 and Aug. 25 launches, respectively, there is a common vibe from those at the helm of the innovative program: optimism.
Monday, 18 August 2014 08:00

Experiential learning at Canadian law schools

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Philip-Bryden1.jpgMany Canadian academics are familiar with the Carnegie Foundation’s 2007 report “Educating Lawyers” and its call for significant changes to the American model of legal education. Although it is an obvious oversimplification of a complex argument, the basic idea advanced in “Educating Lawyers” is that American law schools ought to look beyond preparing their students to do legal analysis and research and devote significantly more attention both to enhancing their students’ practical skills and to developing their professional identity.
Monday, 11 August 2014 08:00

Advice for the overconfident 1L

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_DerekKim.jpgIn March, I had a wonderful opportunity to speak with many incoming 1Ls as part of a panel hosted by the Laurier Law Society. With a level of retrospective comfort (after all, I’m a law student now), I encountered students in one of two broad categories: the overconfident, and the overwrought. For the latter, I am sure nerves will eventually settle as the unfamiliar becomes day-to-day. My advice is for the former.
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