Alan Acton

Alan Acton

Alan Acton is a financial adviser in Ottawa and can be reached at alanacton@polarisfinancial.ca.

Column: Financial Adviser
Investment scams and frauds don’t just happen to the unskilled or unwary investor. Research by the Canadian Securities Administrators, a council of provincial securities regulators in Canada, shows victims of fraud are just as likely to be older, knowledgeable investors, homeowners, well educated, and high-income earners who are confident in their own ability to make investment decisions.
Monday, 10 January 2011 10:38

Portfolio endurance in retirement

The need for retirement planning doesn’t end with the onset of retirement. A new retiree’s focus shifts from building wealth to managing and preserving it. One major challenge is to make the investment portfolio supply cash flow for the duration of life — and through different economic and market conditions.

I read with great interest the C.D. Howe Institute’s recent paper, “The Piggy Bank Index: Matching Canadians’ Savings Rates to Their Retirement Dreams” by David Dodge, Alexandre Laurin, and Colin Busby. It highlights the challenges faced by individuals who are attempting to save enough for their retirement. These difficulties are intensified by relatively low contribution levels for registered retirement savings plans, and low investment returns.

 

Monday, 11 January 2010 07:20

Should you incorporate your legal practice?

In 2001, many provincial governments changed their incorporation laws to include professionals. Since then, lawyers have been eligible to incorporate their legal practices in Ontario.

 

Monday, 12 October 2009 21:00

Saving taxes through income splitting

Each year, the Federal Government of Canada collects close to $100 billion from individual tax payers; this is the government’s single biggest source of revenue.

 

How much do you need to retire?

The annual spring ritual is already underway — the mail out of tax-refund cheques to millions of Canadians. Every year, the federal government returns billions of dollars in overpaid taxes. The average refund in 2007 was approximately $1,400 — not a huge windfall, but still a sum that would be a shame to fritter away. As you know, your tax refund is not found money, it was your money all along that you lent Ottawa interest-free for the year. These funds should be put back to work for you.

With tax season just around the corner, the time has come to make your Registered Retirement Savings Plan contributions for another year. 

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