CURRENT ISSUE

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April, 2017
  • Cross-examining the business valuator

    Expert witnesses in valuation disputes make common mistakes and assumptions that can be drawn out in cross-examination. The expert can be a difficult animal for a lawyer to cross-examine; they are testifying on something that they know better than anyone. Business valuators are important in giving expert evidence in business deals, insolvency and restructuring and transition planning in wealthy families. But if lawyers feel hamstrung or intimidated cross-examining valuation experts, they can take heart in knowing that there are several errors these experts frequently make and learn how to spot them.
  • Artificial intelligence

    AI will change the legal profession, just not how you are expecting. Fernando Garcia is looking forward to the day when he can get his hands on Beagle, an automated contract analysis system powered by artificial intelligence that reads contracts in seconds, highlights key information visually with easy-to-read graphs and charts and gets “smarter” with each reviewed contract.
  • Trudeau’s immigration promises

    Lawyers are cautiously optimistic that the Liberals can continue their positive momentum. Beginning in early March, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada began accepting up to 2,000 permanent resident applications under the new Atlantic Immigration Pilot.

DEPARTMENTS

  • Commercial leases

    Commercial leases

    Agreements between landlords and businesses are becoming increasingly complex as retail and other business needs evolve. A fluctuating and evolving commercial real estate market that has seen high vacancy rates in some areas and changing needs across the country is resulting in more detailed and complex leases.
  • In search of fairness

    In search of fairness

    Toronto criminal lawyer Chris Murphy is seeking justice for the family of a Saskatchewan First Nations man who was fatally shot last August. Chris Murphy’s website for Murphys Criminal Law consists of about three pages that include a brief bio and photo of himself, some contact information and a photo from the movie To Kill A Mockingbird. The photo is of Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch, the fictional lawyer in Harper Lee’s novel of 1960, standing alone in a courtroom.
  • Heenan Blaikie breakdown

    Heenan Blaikie breakdown

    Three years after the collapse of the law firm he helped build, Norman Bacal reflects with his version of the inside story. Two pieces of framed artwork sit propped up against the wall next to Norman Bacal’s new desk at the Toronto offices of intellectual property firm Smart & Biggar Fetherstonaugh. The space is rather sparse — he hasn’t spent a lot of time here yet.

OPINIONS

  • Implementing a technology plan

    Buying technology without a plan is a recipe for failure. lawyer’s practice depends on technology. Furthermore, technology is increasingly being used within law practices to streamline legal processes.
  • Jim Middlemiss

    Learning from Heenan Blaikie’s miscues

    When national law firm Heenan Blaikie LLP blew up in early 2014, I covered the story for Canadian Lawyer, writing about a Frankenstorm of events that caused the firm’s demise. So when former Heenan co-managing partner Norm Bacal’s book Breakdown: The Inside Story of The Rise and Fall of Heenan Blaikie came out in early March, I was curious to read it.
  • Tim Wilbur

    Artificial intelligence is not robot lawyers

    When we look back at 2017, will we describe it as an age of anxiety? It certainly feels that way at the moment. We have seen populist surges across the Western world driven by economic uncertainty and demographic shifts. A media cycle has gone beyond 24 hours to an onslaught of fake news and instant updates.

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