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This week at the SCC

|Written By Heather Gardiner

Finishing up its spring session this week, the Supreme Court of Canada will hear four appeals, including the highly anticipated hearing in the case regarding Canada’s prostitution laws. 

(Photo: Reuters)

June 10 — Saskatchewan — [a href="http://www.scc-csc.gc.ca/case-dossier/cms-sgd/sum-som-eng.aspx?cas=35229" target="_blank"]

Rural Municipality of Britannia v. Acton

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Insurance law: John Acton was seriously injured in a single vehicle rollover accident on a road maintained by the Rural Municipality of Britannia, which had hired Ron Handel Farm Ltd. to do certain work on the road. Action claimed the benefits he received through the Automobile Accident Insurance Act don’t fully cover his rehabilitation costs so he launched a tort action against the Rural Municipality of Britannia and Ron Handel Farm to recover damages. The chambers judge ruled that Acton wasn’t entitled to maintain the tort action. The Court of Appeal allowed his appeal.

Read the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal’s decision.

Other related news articles:

An insured is entitled to pursue a tort claim for his actual loss after deducting no fault benefits, Canadian Insurance Law Blog

June 11 — Alberta — [a href="http://www.scc-csc.gc.ca/case-dossier/cms-sgd/sum-som-eng.aspx?cas=34890" target="_blank"]

Information and Privacy Commissioner v. United Food and Commercial Workers

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Charter of Rights and Freedoms: The United Food and Commercial Workers union recorded a video and took photos of individuals crossing a picket line during a strike. Certain images were published on posters, newsletters, and leaflets. Complaints were subsequently filed with the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta. An adjudicator held that the union was prohibited from collecting, using, and disclosing the video and photos without the individuals’ consent.

Read the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench decision.

Other related news articles:

Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench finds Personal Information Protection Act, regulations, section 7 unconstitutional,

ABlawg

June 12 — Federal Court — [a href="http://www.scc-csc.gc.ca/case-dossier/cms-sgd/sum-som-eng.aspx?cas=34819" target="_blank"]

Bernard v. Attorney General of Canada

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Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Elizabeth Bernard works for the Canada Revenue Agency. She declined to join the union and filed an application for judicial review of a consent order that authorized the disclosure of her home contact information to the union. The Federal Court of Appeal referred the matter to the Public Service Labour Relations Board. The board refused to consider Bernard’s Charter argument and held that disclosure of her information was authorized by the Privacy Act. The Federal Court of Appeal dismissed her application for judicial review.

Read the Federal Court of Appeal’s decision.

Other related news articles:

Karen Selick: Get the picketers off my porch,

National Post

June 13 — Ontario — [a href="http://www.scc-csc.gc.ca/case-dossier/cms-sgd/sum-som-eng.aspx?cas=34788" target="_blank"]

Attorney General of Canada v. Bedford

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Charter of Rights and Freedoms: Former and current sex trade workers challenged the constitutional validity of parts of the Criminal Code that relate to prostitution. The trial judge found these provisions breach s. 7 and s. 2(b) of the Charter. The Court of Appeal allowed the appeal in part.

Read the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision.

Other related news articles:

Sex workers, supporters march in Vancouver ahead of Supreme Court hearing in Ottawa,

The Vancouver Sun

Ontario Appeal Court strikes down ban on brothels, CBC News

Update June 11: Bernard v. Attorney General of Canada will not be heard on June 12.


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