Courthouses of Canada: Annapolis County

I’m a big fan of taking pictures of courthouses and having been doing so whenever I see one while travelling to other parts of Canada. I thought it would be entertaining to start posting some photos of the various beautiful — and even those not-so-beautiful — courthouses from across Canada. I would also encourage readers to send in photos of the courthouses in your cities and towns to Legal Feeds and we’ll post them. If you have any you’d like to share — particularly of some of the country’s older courthouses that may be disappearing (or are already gone) — e-mail them to me and I’ll start posting them. Include information on age, architects, or any other interesting tidbits you may be aware of. Let’s see how many we can catalogue on this blog.

I’ll start off with one from Nova Scotia that I took last month while visiting the province prior to the Canadian Bar Association and Canadian Corporate Counsel Association’s annual meetings.

The Annapolis County courthouse in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is one of the oldest in Canada. It was designed by Francis LeCain and built in 1837 and later enlarged. Still in use, it continues the local presence of the British-based judiciary, which dates from 1721.

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