McInnes Cooper links up with Haynes insurance boutique

McInnes Cooper has boosted its insurance law presence in Atlantic Canada, announcing today a merger with Halifax boutique Haynes Law.

“Merging our two firms under the McInnes Cooper brand will enhance client service and bring greater efficiencies to insurance industry clients at both firms,” said McInnes Cooper’s insurance industry group leader Wendy Johnston. “We’re thrilled to bring together such dedicated groups of lawyers. Clients at both firms will benefit.”

The move, which is effective May 1, brings Hayes Law’s Ross Haynes, Debbie Brown, Franco Tarulli, and Selina Bath to McInnes Cooper, which has about 200 lawyers overall.

“Our clients will greatly benefit from McInnes Cooper’s regional reach, and our lawyers will gain the strength and support of a growing regional business law firm,” said Haynes. “We will continue to service our clients seamlessly, with the attention and quality they have come to expect — now with support in additional locations wherever needed.”

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