Nader R. Hasan

The Top 25 Most Influential 2020 winner

Nader R. Hasan

Toronto
Partner, Stockwoods LLP

Nader Hasan is a lawyer who has participated in numerous criminal, regulatory and constitutional law cases spanning a range of important issues, such as climate change, national security and the rights of Indigenous and racialized persons. This year, Hasan has appeared before the Court of Appeal in R. v. Sharma, which may potentially be an important case discussing the over-incarceration of Indigenous individuals, and in R. v. Morris, which brings up the timely issue of systemic anti-Black racism in sentencing. He is also acting on behalf of the Faqiri family in the case involving the death of Soleiman Faqiri, a mentally ill prisoner who died while in solitary confinement. Last year, he represented seven youths in a constitutional challenge that questioned the Ontario government’s choice to reduce its climate change targets. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, where he has taught classes on evidence, crime and punishment, as well as an advisory board member at the university’s David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights.

 

BUSINESS CONTACT DETAILS:
Company name: Stockwoods LLP
Head office address: 4130-77 King St. W. Toronto, ON M5K 1H1
Phone number: 416-593-1668 / 416-593-7200
Website: www.stockwoods.ca

Recent articles & video

Child proofing your will: Recognizing and avoiding common traps for solicitors

Canada's legal tuition fees among highest in the world

Nominations open today for Canadian Law Awards celebrating nation’s best law firms, deals, lawyers

Roundup of law firm hires, promotions, departures: November 28, 2022 update

Nominate now for Canada's top legal professionals!

Modern law has arrived: Are you keeping pace?

Most Read Articles

Presenting Lexpert’s Rising Stars for 2022

Lexpert Rising Stars Awards winners pay tribute to their mentors at in-person gala

BC Supreme Court orders assessment of legal fees charged in receivership case

CBA's BC branch supports a single regulator model if changes don't impact lawyers' independence