LSUC taps Ryerson, U of O for law practice program

The Law Society of Upper Canada has selected Ryerson University and the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law as the providers of the law practice program, a three-year pilot project that will provide law graduates with an alternative route to licensing.

The law society developed the pilot project to address the lack of articling positions available in Ontario.

Ryerson University — which Bencher Janet Minor called a leader in experiential learning — will provide the English-language LPP and the University of Ottawa will provide the French-language LPP, both starting in September 2014.

At Ryerson, candidates will be divided into groups and act as virtual law firms where they will be exposed to a variety of practice areas. They will be supervised by practitioners and assessed individually and in groups. The program will also incorporate practice management, professionalism, and ethics and include a four-month placement.

Both Ryerson and the University of Ottawa have obtained placements, as required by the law society’s request for proposals released in February.

Bencher Judith Potter expressed some concern about whether placements will be paid, as the law society’s RFP did not require this.

Minor said the professional development and competence committee expects the vast majority of placements will be paid.

The law society also approved Lakehead University Faculty of Law’s integrated practice curriculum, which incorporates experiential training into the three years of law school so that graduates are ready to be licensed. This means students will be able to practise after graduation once they pass the bar exam; they will not have to complete articling or the LPP.

To make up for the difference, students will complete additional hours during their three years of law school. Skills training will also be incorporated into all years of law school, not just the final year. Skills-based tutorials and classes will be taught by law professors and practitioners, and in third year, students will complete a four-month work placement in northern Ontario.

Bencher Barbara Murchie, a vice chairwoman of the committee, said, “Lakehead has a clear commitment to graduating practice-ready lawyers.”

Recent articles & video

Cross-border M&A will continue to deal with aggressive antitrust enforcement in 2024, says lawyer

BC's new family law legal aid funding resolves long-standing Charter challenge

Redefining legal services: MT Align president Linda Beairsto on flexible work and diversity

Last chance to take part in the 2024 Top Personal Injury Boutiques survey

Federal Court welcomes Justices Julie Blackhawk and Angus Grant

Yukon government extends public engagement for Child Care Act review

Most Read Articles

Poilievre's solution to car thefts ignores reality in favour of easy politics

New provincial court judge Luc Roy appointed in New Brunswick

Search underway for 5-Star Pro Bono Firms

BC Sheriff Service expands with 13 new recruits to boost court security