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Spike in infrastructure spending means more land expropriation, but businesses seek clarity on rules

Current wave of public infrastructure investment can be a concern for property owners: lawyers

Spike in infrastructure spending means more land expropriation, but businesses seek clarity on rules
John Doherty

Billions of dollars have been pouring into infrastructure projects across the country in recent years, thanks to a 12-year federal government plan. And more will likely follow as governments look to re-build their economies post COVID-19. In April, Alberta — anticipating unemployment to reach 25 per cent as a result of the double whammy of the health crisis and plunging oil prices — announced a doubling of its budget this year for infrastructure maintenance and renewal to $1.9 billion.  

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