Richard Wagner

Richard Wagner

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada

Supreme Court of Canada Chief Justice Richard Wagner was sworn in in December 2017 and previously served as a puisne justice of the SCC. Bilingual and reliable for his final verdicts, Wagner’s decisions have impacted important matters in Canadian law. In R. v. Antic (2017), he ruled in favour of the defendant who argued they have a right not to be denied reasonable bail without just cause. In Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp (2017), he ruled in favour of the defendant arguing that there shouldn’t be discrimination based on mental and physical disability. And in Uniprix inc. v. Gestion Gosselin et Bérubé inc. (2016), he ruled on contract interpretation and renewal clauses. Wagner has spoken out about the importance of making the SCC better understood by improving transparency.

WHAT VOTERS HAD TO SAY:
“The appointment of Chief Justice Richard Wagner to the nation’s top court ensured that this important position was put in good hands.”

 

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