Roundup of law firm resources on COVID-19: April 23 update

This week’s update on resources shared by law firms addressing the COVID-19 crisis

Roundup of law firm resources on COVID-19: April 23 update

Law firms across Canada are sharing their insights on how to deal with the rapidly evolving economic and legal landscape due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Below is a roundup of some of these resources.

Hull & Hull LLP

In “Virtual Witnessing of Wills and Powers of Attorney With Less Risk,” the firm provides commentary on the steps suggested by the Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company to reduce the risk of estate-law-related malpractice claims. The firm also shares the checklists that it created for the execution of wills and powers of attorney by video.

Other resources:

Pitblado LLP

In “COVID-19 and Family Law-Related Issues,” the firm discusses the impact of the pandemic on family law matters, procedures and proceedings, particularly with regard to court closures, trials, triage conferences, document filings, child support and parenting time, among others.

Other resources:

ROBIC LLP

In “Diversifying your product offering to combat COVID-19: what are the implications for trademarks?,” the firm explores the issue of trademark protection vis-à-vis the recent diversified offerings of businesses aiming to address the shortage in medical equipment and hygiene products amid the public health crisis.

In “Freeze (or Re-Freeze): Come Out of the COVID-19 Crisis With Your Hands Up (in a Victory Pose!),” the firm introduces the concept of an estate freeze and lists the potential benefits of using this estate-planning technique, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 crisis.

Other resources:

Wildeboer Dellelce LLP

In “COVID-19 Considerations for Asset Managers,” the firm identifies a number of operational and compliance-related considerations for asset managers, including investment policies and strategies, pricing methodology and the management of a fund’s liquidity needs.

Other resources:

Harper Grey LLP

In “Your Continued Obligation to Close Your Real Estate Transaction During the COVID-19 Pandemic,” the firm emphasizes the importance of closing real estate transactions instead of adopting a wait-and-see attitude and potentially incurring a contractual breach.

Other resources:

Burnet, Duckworth & Palmer LLP

Given that the pandemic has led some companies in Canada to consider whether they can hold their annual general meetings remotely, in “Guidance for conducting virtual AGMs in response to COVID-19,” the firm lists some key points for these companies to keep in mind. The considerations discussed include the question of whether these meetings can be postponed or adjourned and the issue of what constitutes adequate notice of such virtual or hybrid meetings.\

Other resources:

Hicks Morley Hamilton Stewart Storie LLP

In “COVID-19 Update: Questions and Answers for Municipalities,” the firm explores issues relevant to municipalities in light of the recent orders issued by the Ontario government affecting the operations of municipalities. The firm discusses possible financial support and staff reductions, among other matters.

Other resources:

Whitten & Lublin PC

Recent articles & video

BC Court of Appeal overturns ruling requiring disclosure of privileged information on birth alerts

Ontario Superior Court finds Ottawa negligent in response to Uber's entry, damaging taxi industry

BC Supreme Court upholds drivers' liability in car crash injuring cyclist

Ontario Superior Court orders child's return from Alberta in custody dispute

Alberta court rules expert evidence inadmissible following settlement in medical negligence case

New metric developed to assess socioeconomic challenges of US law school applicants

Most Read Articles

Alberta court refuses to stay bankruptcy proceedings in favour of family law proceedings

New CRA audit powers proposed in federal budget raise uncertainty, say Davies tax lawyers

Mergers and acquisitions in the AI space need unique due diligence considerations: Dentons lawyers

Poilievre's plan to trample Charter rights won't stop at tough-on-crime measures