CBA launches new Indigenous cultural competency training program

CBA is offering 500 free registrations

CBA launches new Indigenous cultural competency training program

As a part of its commitment to addressing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s call to extend appropriate cultural competency training to lawyers, the Canadian Bar Association this month will launch The Path – Your Journey Through Indigenous Canada.

The program provides education on the legacy of the Indian Residential School System and other key events in history that defined the relationships of Indigenous communities to European settlers, the British Crown and Canada. Later sessions will then “demystify” the legal issues that arise in connection the Indian Act, treaties, other relevant legislation and case law, by phrasing such issues in a more practical way, said the CBA.

Aside from honing the cultural competency of lawyers, the program aims to combat racism and bias against Indigenous peoples. It also seeks to assist lawyers in appreciating the significance of Indigenous cultural traditions and values and in building better relationships with Indigenous communities, said the CBA.

NVision Insight Group, a majority-owned Indigenous consulting company, developed The Path, which features five online modules, which can be accessed in either English or French. Every module consists of two videos, each with a 10-point quiz.

Members may register via the CBA’s Truth and Reconciliation microsite. The CBA is extending 500 free registrations to those who sign up.

“The on-demand series of videos are in the process of being accredited for 4 hours of professionalism/ethics/diversity/inclusion credits,” said the CBA.

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