NS Human Rights Commission welcomes new commissioners Blair Eavis and Natasha Pearl

Eavis was a naval officer while Pearl worked as a legal assistant with Patterson Law

NS Human Rights Commission welcomes new commissioners Blair Eavis and Natasha Pearl

The Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission has announced the appointment of two new commissioners alongside the reappointment of three existing members.

The commission convenes six times annually and is tasked with setting strategic directions and resolving human rights complaints through referrals to boards of inquiry. The new appointees to the commission are Blair Eavis and Natasha Pearl from Halifax.

With a Juris Doctor of Law, Blair Eavis has nearly two decades of experience as a naval reserve officer with the Department of National Defence. His expertise extends to international law of the sea, naval operations, intelligence, and operational planning. Eavis is actively involved in the community, serving on the boards of the Cobequid Cultural Society and the Sackville Rivers Association, and has previously worked as a caseworker with student legal assistance at the University of Calgary.

Natasha Pearl, also from Halifax, has a background as a legal assistant with Patterson Law and the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission. Currently serving as an executive coordinator with the commission, Pearl works closely with African Nova Scotian and Indigenous social workers, coordinating appeals and providing client support. Her commitment to equity and racial diversity is reflected in her membership on the commission’s equity and racial diversity committee.

The reappointed commissioners, who have previously contributed to the commission's work, are:

  • Monica Paris is an information technology systems analyst with extensive experience in employment equity and diversity.
  • Robin Thompson, Cree Métis, has a strong background in law, Indigenous community governance, and human rights advocacy.
  • Theodore Morrison is a retired schoolteacher and dedicated volunteer known for his advocacy for accessibility rights and support for students with disabilities.

“Commissioners play an important role in the protection of the rights of Nova Scotians,” said Joseph Fraser, Director and CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. “Having a diversity of experience and perspectives at the table ensures critical decisions about human rights are informed by first-voice knowledge and insight.”

The new appointments, effective from February 9, are for a three-year term and were made by an order of Executive Council.

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