New Brunswick to require liquor servers and sellers at licensed establishments to undergo training

Regulation permits sale of drinks with food orders for take-out or delivery, effective this month

New Brunswick to require liquor servers and sellers at licensed establishments to undergo training
New Brunswick’s justice department announces mandatory training for new liquor rules

Effective Sept. 1, those serving and selling liquor at licensed establishments in New Brunswick have to take Responsible Beverage, a mandatory online training course, in accordance with amendments, tabled in 2020, to the Liquor Control Act, RSNB 1973, c L-10.

The Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick is offering the training course on responsible practices to owners of licensed establishments free of charge until Mar. 31, 2022, owing to funding of $150,000 from the province’s post-secondary education, training and labour department, said the news release from New Brunswick’s justice and public safety department on May 4. Completing the four-hour course leads to a five-year certification.

“Many Canadian provinces require that bartenders and servers be trained on how to refuse service if a consumer is intoxicated, as well as other regulatory matters,” said Hugh Flemming, New Brunswick’s justice and public safety minister, in the news release. Flemming approved of the decision to extend a flexible training option for participants.

“We are very happy to have been able to work out an arrangement with the provincial government so that online training for staff at licensed establishments can be provided free of charge for a determined period of time,” said Carol Alderdice, president and chief executive officer of the Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick.

“By funding this online training program, we support a valuable public safety initiative without having a negative effect upon employers or employees,” said Trevor Holder, the province’s post-secondary education, training and labour minister.

MADD Canada has approved the training course as compliant with its national curriculum standards.

New Brunswick’s news release also announced that regulations relating to the Liquor Control Act will allow the sale of liquor with food orders for take-out or delivery, as of May 1. This activity was previously temporarily permitted pursuant to an emergency order.

Flemming noted that allowing this activity has benefited the province’s industry during these challenging economic times and that other jurisdictions introduced similar changes amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We are pleased that restaurants can continue to offer this service to their customers, following the rules established in regulation,” said Flemming. Flemming urged New Brunswickers to consume alcohol responsibly and moderately and to refrain from drinking and driving.

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